Music, Stupidity, Treating Fans Like Shit

Jon Bon Jovi – The power is in his hands to change the way his fans buy tickets

Bon Jovi – Because We Can Telstra pre sales went on sale on Monday, 13 May, 2013 at 9am.  By 9.01am, the Bang Tango site crashed. Within an hour, Telstra and Bang Tango both posted an update. It was the clichéd “due to high demand or high volumes, you may experience delays in accessing this website”.

It wasn’t until 6.35pm that the Bon Jovi Facebook page posted an update;

Thank you to all the fans who have taken part in the Telstra Australian Pre-Sale so far! Due to the massive amount of traffic the BangTango Pre-Sale site was temporarily down but is now back up and running! Thank you for your patience. Get your Pre-Sale tickets now: http://bit.ly/13cryk3.

I can’t believe that in this day and age, Bon Jovi is using the “massive amount of traffic” phrase.  Seriously, what did they expect, a couple of hundred people to go online.  This is Bon Jovi we are talking about, the same band that released a box set called 100,000,000 Fans Cant Be Wrong.

Back in 2010, they played multiple stadium shows in Australia in each city and each show was sold out, so of course they would expect a “massive amount of traffic” this time around.

Furthermore, the Backstage JBJ fan club didn’t have any issue coping with the heavy amount of traffic, where fans coughed up a further $60 to join, just to spend more money on tickets.  Then there is the stupid limitations that Bon Jovi places.  A fan can only purchase 2 tickets.

How does that work for me, if I want to take my wife and my three kids to the concert?  From reading all the comments on the various Facebook pages, other fans are also in the same boat.

The mainstream press refuse to do any reporting on this.

Jon Bon Jovi has the power to change the way the ticketing is handled.  One thing I have noticed from today’s artists is that they always blame someone else.  They very rarely take responsibility for their actions.  Jon has Kid Rock opening up for him on the Australian tour.  What Jon should do is take a lesson from Kid Rock on transparency and responsibility.  

Kid Rock’s summer tour of the U.S. is all $20.  As he mentions, the artist has the power to change the ticket prices, the price of T-shirts and so on.  He also mentions that they he will be reselling some of his tickets or go paperless where it is legal in the U.S to do so, so that he can combat scalpers.  Furthermore, Kid Rock, has a special reserved section close to the stage, for his people to find audience members and put them there. Click on the Rolling Stone article. 

Another big call from Kid Rock was that he didn’t want a guaranteed fee.  He backed himself, that he was going to sell tickets.  That is exactly what he did.  Compared to his 2011 box office returns it is looking like he will double that in 2013.

Kid Rock is scaling back, however Jon Bon Jovi is not.

Will Jon Bon Jovi, ever do the same as Kid Rock?  Based on him partnering up with Telstra/Bang Tango, because they paid the most to secure the pre sales slot, my answer is NO.

GREED is what the great divide in income inequality has brought.  Jon Bon Jovi is pissed that sales of recorded music have dropped so on each tour he is raising the ticket prices.  Eventually, he will be doing business like the Rolling Stones current tour, where the public was giving the Stones a big stiff middle finger at the $650 price tag, and then a day before the gig, the prices dropped to $80 and everyone snapped them up.

Ticketek get their chance to shine on May 20.  They know that they will be hammered with fans trying to get tickets.  They are prepared for it, they have partnered up with innovative technologies.  Read the article. 

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3 thoughts on “Jon Bon Jovi – The power is in his hands to change the way his fans buy tickets

  1. Pingback: Bon Jovi – Attack of The Showbiz Pre-Sales | destroyerofharmony

  2. Pingback: Bon Jovi – What is going on with Richie Sambora, plus ticket sales | destroyerofharmony

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